How can Africans on the continent and in the diaspora find common ground and collaborate?

Bullied for her looks, Kyemah McEntyre claps back at critics for her "African looks" by embracing her heritage and showing up at prom looking like 150% pure African ethereal royalty!

Bullied for her appearance, Kyemah McEntyre claps back at critics for her “African looks” by embracing her heritage and showing up at prom looking like 150% pure African ethereal royalty!

I have to confess, where African and diaspora relations are concerned, I thought that it would be simpler to frame my thoughts and present them than the task has proven to be. I have been – in a word – naïve. There is nothing simple about the factors that separate or, conversely, bind people of African descent in the least. The numerous conversations I’ve either participated in or witnessed have borne this out.

First of all, one has to account for the fact that people of African descent in the diaspora are not even unified around what to call themselves. Names and verbal identifiers have power, something that virtually every African society recognizes, understands, and takes pains to execute with meaning and honor. In the same way, Black people in the diaspora are very conscious of what to call themselves as a group. Some within this microcosm of the African family are comfortable with being identified as “African American,” while others rebuff the label, stating that they are simply “Black.”

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2 thoughts on “How can Africans on the continent and in the diaspora find common ground and collaborate?

  1. Morenike

    For this sort of collaboration to even begin, we need to know each other’s history and in much greater detail than what is shared by our colonized institutions and media.

    1. Malaka Post author

      Right, right! A lot of what we know is exaggeration or just plain false. When I first returned to America after having been gone for a decade, I was deathly afraid when I walked onto my HBCU campus. I thought all Black Americans were violent criminals who carried guns.

      I went to Hampton University, the epicenter of Black Bourgeoisie-ness. I was on the safest place in God’s creation.

      It took a month for me to realize that.

      We REALLY have to learn more about each other.

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