In Response to the Honorable Rashid Pelpuo’s “Disgust”

Greetings, oh Venerable Rashid Pelpuo. How good of you to condescend to my blog and leave a comment regarding a topic that is piercing to many a forward thinking Ghanaian citizen’s heart: that being the gradual and steady destruction of our country and who is responsible for it. Let’s get right down to it, shall we?

jarvisHave you ever seen Iron Man? I would like to invite you to participate in an exercise that Tony Stark undertakes in virtually every instance that his A.I. butler, JARVIS, presents him with data. We’re going to throw out the stuff in your comments that have nothing to do with the crux of the conversation or concerns of the citizenry and see what we have left. Let’s begin with your quips about my ‘flare’ for writing (Yes. I do write with fiery passion. Thanks for noticing.), about engaging in armchair research (which is now an archaic idiom, since no one does research from their armchair anymore, but rather on their fingertips in fast moving vehicles), your presumptions about my profession (I’m NOT a journalist, but I’m flattered that you mistook me for one.), an insipid complaint about me not knowing you (And how could I? we’re not neighbors and have never invited one another over for tea.) and a veiled accusation of my possible suffering from xenophobia.

(Actually, I DO want to talk about xenophobia. If I’m interpreting your response correctly, I think it may be an issue that has long been a thorn in your side. We’ll get to that at the end.)

So what do we have left to discuss? A man in a position of power with a job to do; and THAT sir, is all that I and the good people of Ghana, be they within the borders of the country or the Diaspora really care about.

We live in the information age, sir, and as you well know information is a more vital commodity than cash. You had the unique opportunity to inspire confidence in all who are concerned about the direction that this government that you are an integral part of is taking us, simply by providing pertinent information, yet you chose not to. Instead, you gave a canned response by copying and pasting a rejoinder written sometime last month.

Did you read any of the grievances of the folks who left comments on this blog bearing your name and title? I’ll take a quick guess and say “no”. Here are their questions and concerns in short form:

 

  • What education do you actually possess that qualifies you for this position? You did not give mention of that in your response, only saying that I got your credentials wrong. Pray, what ARE your credentials? You are responsible for making sure that all the information on the internet about yourself is cohesive, and I have to tell you, it is the very opposite of the adjective.
  • What is the timeline that citizens engaged in private enterprise can look to for implementation of these “five flagship projects” you alluded to in your rejoinder? Does one even exist? Who can be held accountable when this timeline goes off course? (And we ALL know sir, that it will be stalled at some point.)
  • Exactly what sort of investments is the government – and I assume this falls under your branch – providing to indigenous business? How are these case analyses being carried out? What sort of business are getting a particular type of assistance? Some will need cash infusion, sure, but others will need infrastructure and equipment rather than cash.
  • Will citizens engaging in private enterprise still be made to pay crushing tariffs at our ports of entry on imported goods to help facilitate their businesses in the face of a government that simply WILL NOT provide a sustainable means of generating the hardware needed to facilitate x business?
  • Who is going to answer these questions?

 

Concerning xenophobia: I understand why you mentioned it. In reading the comments of the proletariat in our mainstream media, there were many unkind things said about you. That you were running your department like it was a zongo republic. That you behave as though Ghana was a makaranta school. I’m sure I don’t need to rehash these. It will not edify anyone reading this reply. For the benefit of full disclosure, I am a hybrid-Ghanaian who grew up in a Muslim/Christian household and went to school students from all over Africa and Ghana, of course. For me to succumb to xenophobia would be absurd and beneath my dignity, as I myself don’t fit into one traditional category.That doesn’t bother me, and I would certainly expect that you being  from the North doesn’t bother you.

I don’t know you personally, Mr. Pelpuo; and I don’t need to. I don’t know if you kiss your kids or whip them at night before you send them to bed. Unless your kids are helping you write policy, your personal pursuits have nothing to do with me.

I care about one thing only: How well do you do your job… and how effectively you communicate your progress.

In parting, I have this bit of advice. You are either going to have to do one of three things from here on out. 1) Get greater control of your message. 2) Grow a thicker skin. 3) Ignore all criticism altogether and send our country deeper into the bowels of destruction. The days when ordinary citizens took it on the chin lying down are fast drawing to a close. Where we sense knavery, we will dig it up and expose it. We will no longer allow those who claim to serve Ghana and its interests hide behind the ubiquitous shield of “government”. We will name names and demand accountability according to the titles apportioned to those names.

These are the times, Venerable Pelpuo. I wish you the best of luck as you cruise these uncharted waters.

 

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11 thoughts on “In Response to the Honorable Rashid Pelpuo’s “Disgust”

  1. Ekuba

    Lol, eii Malaka after this post,I can now see that you are a real ‘obaa denden’ aka Iron Lady. 🙂 It really takes a lot of courage to stand up for principles that you believe in like you’ve done especially when you’re confronting people in authority. Bravo! And I always thought your BFFFL Nana D was the toughest person among the two of you. Hmm, obviously I was wrong!

    1. Malaka Post author

      Oohhhh. As for that my BFFFL? Don’t sleep on her! We are equally tough, which is why we never clash. In warfare, we employ different tactics. While I will blindly charge the field, she will use guerrilla skills to overcome her opponent. You will ALWAYS see me coming. But that woman? She’ll slit your throat.

  2. Abeku Austin

    Hey Malaka,
    Ordinarily i choose not to response to blogs like yours because as far as i care, you can tell the seriousness of a blog by doing some research on the writer and reading the contents on the blog. However following your misleading comments and your obvious desire for attention, i will respond, if only, to set the records straight.
    I am not sure what you call yourself; a journalist or a person seeking attention by publishing falsehood about people.
    If you have had any education at all, and i pray that you have, you will know education is only a means to an end and not an end in itself. At least you acknowledge that Rashid has a master’s degree. The discussions about the kind of educational qualification a person possesses is petty at best and clearly indicates ignorance about what the key driver of excellence performance is. To be able to now a person’s capacity to perform, it is critical to find out what a person’s has achieved in his career. I hasten to say that for any seasoned journalist, the answer will come from a thorough investigation, rather than putting up frivolous information on a so called blog and hoping to draw attention and then when the person in question responds you put questions to him. Let me suggest that a preferable approach will have been to use your journalistic prowess to reach Rashid Pelpuo on the nagging questions you have and incorporate it into your report. A key principle of journalism is fair reportage and the incorporation of the POV of the person in question even if you disagree with the comments.
    I find it appalling that you do an entire publication juts on the basis of an ‘armchair research’. The pen is a powerful tool, I am personally appalled by the occasional tyranny of the pen from attention seekers like yourself.
    I will implore you to read the private sector development strategy II dubbed PSDS II (which is a key strategy document for government to address the nagging challenges of the private sector). As we speak, and if you indeed had done your research well (that is if you even did one at all), you will have heard numerous indications of an on-going efforts at orienting government officials, the media, and the private sector on the key tenets of that strategy document. PSDS II follows on from the successful roll out of PSDS I and was put together after broader stakeholder consultations especially with the private sector. There is a lot of information on this strategy on the internet and I did not have to be a whizz kid to find it.
    All your questions have been adequately addressed in the PSDS ii document plus more. My understanding of Rashids role is to be up-weight the focus placed on private sector issues in all polices across ministries as well as to drive the implementation of PSDS ii (WHICH IS A FIVE YEAR STRATEGY).
    Is it not a bit surprising that you have been able to jump to conclusion on a person’s competency without evening knowing what his role involves. What benchmark did you apply?
    To all well meaning Ghanaians, the actual statements that Rashid made on support for local businesses is available all over the internet, including comments from the Association of Ghana industries, retractions from the media houses etc. No where did Rashid suggest that GHANA will not support local business. Various regulations in Ghana including the GIPC bill, relevant laws on mining, oil etc embed local content. Indeed the central theme of PSDS ii is to improve Ghanas global competiveness especially for SMES in Ghana.
    Rather than give credence to incompetent attention seekers without any knowledge on subjects they write about using crude outdated methods, let’s be insightful and offer constructive criticism with the aim of making our governance better.

    1. Malaka Post author

      First of all, it’s “I choose not to RESPOND”, not “to response”. You gbaad a shot.

      Second, why would you choose this day to do something you wouldn’t ordinarily do? Believe me, it would have been better if you had just stuck to your habit because:

      Third and finally: I have 4 kids and a husband staring me in the face at all hours of the day. What makes you think I need YOUR time and attention? Who the hell are you again??? That’s right… NOBODY to me.

      Shhhh. Don’t say another word.

  3. Johnson Adjie

    Meet the man Ruining Ghana
    Malaka you’re too harsh on this occasion. Much as we want to critic our leaders we still want to be civil when it comes to discussing serious matters of state concerns. . I love it when we take on our politicians but not when they can be humble and respond to criticisms. But do you actually mean it when you try to establish that a minister must have some academic qualification or some other experience in order to head a particular ministry? I find that strange. Rashid Pelpuo was easily the best minister when he was minister of sports. In fact two radio stations voted him among the best but he never managed sports before that. Reagan is one of America’s great presidents but he was a movie star until he entered politics. Churchill dropped out of school for poor performance but he is one of Britain’s all time best leaders. You can count them on and on. Pelpuo got an A grade from African watch magazine as deputy leader of Ghana’s parliament. Malaka you just said you’re not a journalist but you’re practising it. Will you take it lightly if you were undermined. I just noticed that you were amused at pelpuo’s reaction because you felt offended.

    Perhaps Pelpuo should have just kept quiet but I think a response was an opportunity to think differently but you resorted to name calling. I genuinely think you should have just handled this issue Differently and better.
    Am saying all this because I listened to the reaction of Rashid Pelpuo when the issue of his pronouncement came up the very first day. I remember his explanation on city fm was supported by both the chamber of commerce and the private enterprises federation. It became obvious that the reporter didn’t do a good job. His caption and slant were both not helpful. I suppose you could also have done better rather than jut characterised the minister as the man ruining Ghana. I think you actually made a mistake there Malaka. Once you take on a Politician we’ll always support you. I am a political but you’ll always find others supporting for political reasons. So sometimes it’s not because you say the truth but because it’s opportunity for people to fight a political fight. So please do due diligence for us Malaka

    Anyway Good job Malaka but just take it easy sometimes.

  4. Johnson Adjie

    Malaka you’re too harsh on this occasion. Much as we want to critic our leaders we still want to be civil when it comes to discussing serious matters of state concerns. . I love it when we take on our politicians but not when they can be humble and respond to criticisms. But do you actually mean it when you try to establish that a minister must have some academic qualification or some other experience in order to head a particular ministry? I find that strange. Rashid Pelpuo was easily the best minister when he was minister of sports. In fact two radio stations voted him among the best but he never managed sports before that. Reagan is one of America’s great presidents but he was a movie star until he entered politics. Churchill dropped out of school for poor performance but he is one of Britain’s all time best leaders. You can count them on and on. Pelpuo got an A grade from African watch magazine as deputy leader of Ghana’s parliament. Malaka you just said you’re not a journalist but you’re practising it. Will you take it lightly if you were undermined. I just noticed that you were amused at pelpuo’s reaction because you felt offended.

    Perhaps Pelpuo should have just kept quiet but I think a response was an opportunity to think differently but you resorted to name calling. I genuinely think you should have just handled this issue Differently and better.
    Am saying all this because I listened to the reaction of Rashid Pelpuo when the issue of his pronouncement came up the very first day. I remember his explanation on city fm was supported by both the chamber of commerce and the private enterprises federation. It became obvious that the reporter didn’t do a good job. His caption and slant were both not helpful. I suppose you could also have done better rather than jut characterised the minister as the man ruining Ghana. I think you actually made a mistake there Malaka. Once you take on a Politician we’ll always support you. I am a political but you’ll always find others supporting for political reasons. So sometimes it’s not because you say the truth but because it’s opportunity for people to fight a political fight. So please do due diligence for us Malaka

    Anyway Good job Malaka but just take it easy sometimes.

  5. Johnson Adjie

    Much as we want to critic our leaders we still want to be civil when it comes to discussing serious matters of state concerns. . I love it when we take on our politicians but not when they can be humble and respond to criticisms. But do you actually mean it when you try to establish that a minister must have some academic qualification or some other experience in order to head a particular ministry? I find that strange. Rashid Pelpuo was easily the best minister when he was minister of sports. In fact two radio stations voted him among the best but he never managed sports before that. Reagan is one of America’s great presidents but he was a movie star until he entered politics. Churchill dropped out of school for poor performance but he is one of Britain’s all time best leaders. You can count them on and on. Pelpuo got an A grade from African watch magazine as deputy leader of Ghana’s parliament. Malaka you just said you’re not a journalist but you’re practising it. Will you take it lightly if you were undermined. I just noticed that you were amused at pelpuo’s reaction because you felt offended.

    Perhaps Pelpuo should have just kept quiet but I think a response was an opportunity to think differently but you resorted to name calling. I genuinely think you should have just handled this issue Differently and better.
    Am saying all this because I listened to the reaction of Rashid Pelpuo when the issue of his pronouncement came up the very first day. I remember his explanation on city fm was supported by both the chamber of commerce and the private enterprises federation. It became obvious that the reporter didn’t do a good job. His caption and slant were both not helpful. I suppose you could also have done better rather than jut characterised the minister as the man ruining Ghana. I think you actually made a mistake there Malaka. Once you take on a Politician we’ll always support you. I am a political but you’ll always find others supporting for political reasons. So sometimes it’s not because you say the truth but because it’s opportunity for people to fight a political fight. So please do due diligence for us Malaka

    Anyway Good job Malaka but just take it easy sometimes.

  6. David S.

    Aei, Am I reading this right? You are being trolled by MPs now? Now I want to read the original comment.

    1. Malaka Post author

      First if all David: I’ve missed you, and I’m not ashamed to admit it. Secondly: Yes ohhh!!! Why is there a WHOLE MP on my blog? And some other son of a whore whose comment I had to delete and block from ever commenting again because he was so vile followed soon after. I’m assuming he and the Honorable are friends.

  7. Sel

    This thread is getting stale at this point and not to flog a dying horse but I had to squeeze in my two cents. Namely: Johnson Adjie and ilk, take a breath.

    In this day, after all the abominable leadership our countries in Africa had struggled under for the past 50 years, if the question is between harshness and silence, I say shoot first and ask questions later. Yes, I said it! Once bitten, you will feel the pain!

    So allow Malaka to free her mind on her blog and for the honorable to make his case to the contrary if he so wishes (which he has proven quite capable of doing), otherwise what business would he have being any noteworthy leader of our great country anyways?

    Besides I want to believe the readership of this blog is discerning enough to apportion credit where it is due.

    In conclusion, I say take a breath ooo, your over-protesting may be actually doing your cause more harm than good in the long run. After all if there is no muck, the feathers will not stick (just made that up btw), or?

    Signed,
    An unceremoniously awoken Ghanaian-Nigerian

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